Why Crocs Have Bumps Inside (Surprising Reason)

One little detail that often gets overlooked is the little, tiny nubs on the footbed of Crocs. So, why do Crocs have bumps and little dots inside?

The bumps or the footbed nubs (little dots) inside Crocs are designed to create a subtle massage-like feel and improve circulation while you wear them. They are also useful to help your feet stay put inside the Crocs, without slipping and sliding.

However, are these bumps actually useful or are they just gimmicks? In this post, let’s explore why Crocs have bumps inside, including which models have them.

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Why Do Crocs Have Bumps (Little Dots) Inside?

According to Crocs, while their footbed nubs do not actually emulate the real feeling of foot reflexology, they are designed to improve circulation and create a massage-like feel.

The idea behind these little bumps originates from acupressure points.

Much like acupressure mats or slippers, which are covered with hundreds of plastic nubs, these small bulges deliver pressure to parts of the body in contact with the surface.

An acupressure mat, the idea behind the little nubs on Crocs.

Acupressure therapy is similar to acupuncture, but acupressure mats do not contain needles or puncture the skin. Instead, they stimulate pressure points on the bottom of the foot.

While the effectiveness of acupressure based on scientific evidence is limited, there are many people who have enjoyed the benefits of wearing acupressure mats or slippers. 

Unfortunately, the little nubs on Crocs’ footbeds are not nearly as tough as acupuncture slippers. They are very soft and are made of the same materials as the Crocs.

In fact, there are plenty of Crocs owners who reported that these bumps on the footbeds do not actually massage their feet, but tickle them instead.

Do all Crocs have little bumps inside?

Not all Crocs have little nubs inside.

While most of their Classic Clogs have little bumps inside, the Classic Lined Clogs and Classic Fur Sure do not have bumps inside since their footbeds are covered with warm, fuzzy liner.

The Crocs On-The-Rock LiteRide Slip-Ons also do not have bumps inside, since they are designed as restaurant, healthcare, and service industry footwear.

Instead of little bumps, the toe and heel are enclosed to meet workplace standards. Here are some of the most popular Crocs without bumps inside:

Crocs classic lined clogs (browse colors on Amazon)

Crocs Blitzen III fuzzy slippers (browse colors on Amazon)

How to Get Rid of Bumps in Crocs

Not everyone is a fan of the little bumps inside Crocs. If you are one of them, and you are looking to get rid of them, here are 4 tips you can do today:

1. Give them time

If you don’t like the feeling of these bumps, the best thing you can do is to just give them time. These little nubs should wear out quickly with regular wear.

Crocs are sort of like soft plastic sponges and do not need a lot of time to break into.

In fact, they’re very soft like marshmallows. The footbed itself isn’t anything like the nubby, hard surface of Teva or Chaco sandals (which we’ve also found irritating ourselves).

Try wearing your Crocs for a while and you’ll see that you don’t need to modify them. Sure, the nubs may feel “pokey” at first, but they would become unnoticeable after a few weeks.

2. Wear socks in the beginning

If for some reason, they bother you, you can wear socks until the little nubs wear out.

Not only do socks keep your feet sweat-free on hot days, but they can also keep your feet warm in the winter. After a while, the little nubs should flatten out with regular wear.

For those of you who think that Crocs and socks are a horrible combination, we beg to differ! As long as you are confident with what you wear, you can wear Crocs and socks all day.

Oh, and they help prevent potential blisters too! 

3. Add insoles to your Crocs

Instead of wearing socks, you can always add insoles to your Crocs.

Since the shape of Crocs is designed to cup both of your feet, a simple pair of insoles like the one below should be able to seamlessly fit inside the footbed.

Comfortable Orthotics Inserts (buy WALKHERO on Amazon):

The insoles above are covered with breathable fabric that reduces friction and keeps the feet cool. Inside, the built-in silicone material offers shock absorption and reduces pressure.

While they are technically designed for shoes and sneakers, you can give them a try inside your Crocs if you genuinely hate the feeling of the tiny nubs. 

Once the nubs are gone, you can remove the insoles and wear your Crocs normally.

4. Clip them with toenail clippers

If you really want to get rid of the bumps inside Crocs, you can clip them with toenail clippers. It would be tricky to get the correct angle inside the Crocs near the toes, though.

Honestly, clipping the nubs would leave the Crocs even more irritating as you would leave unfinished edges, and would probably never get them completely even.

We highly recommend leaving the little bumps alone. 

5. Buy a new pair of lined Crocs

A less destructive solution is to buy a new pair of lined Crocs instead.

Crocs have plenty of footwear choices without little bumps inside. Their lined clogs, for example, are equipped with warm and fuzzy liners that are incredibly pleasant.

Crocs classic lined clogs (browse colors on Amazon)

Crocs Blitzen III fuzzy slippers (browse colors on Amazon)

While the Croslite™ foam keeps them light and easy to wear, the toasty liner offers comfort all season long. The soft, fuzzy liner adds to the cushion and comfort, indoors or out. 

Great as slippers, yet capable of running errands, too.

Bottom Line

Now you know why Crocs have little bumps on the inside.

Whether you like it or not, Crocs is definitely doing something right with the little nubs because at the end of the day, our feet are never sore after long hours of wearing Crocs.

Instead of trying to get rid of the bumps inside Crocs, try to embrace them instead. Chances are, you wouldn’t notice them after a few wears.

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